Does Three Thousand Years of Longing have post credit scene?

by Narendra

Does Three Thousand Years of Longing have post credit scene: George Miller’s movie is a passionate look at how making images and telling stories go hand in hand.

On a trip to Istanbul, a lonely scholar meets a Djinn who gives her three wishes in exchange for setting him free.

“Storytelling” has become a buzzword in Hollywood, at least in recent years. It is used by creative people in the industry and their public relations teams to talk up the importance and value of a movie or TV show.

Hollywood has always been in the business of telling stories, so this is nothing new. But in a cinematic world full of prequels, sequels, and bloated cinematic universes, self-proclaimed storytellers often seem to overemphasize the importance of narrative to hide a lack of originality in both the stories they tell and the images they use to tell them.

Three Thousand Years of Longing

That’s part of the reason why George Miller’s Three Thousand Years of Longing feels like a breath of fresh air. The movie not only looks at the nature of storytelling in a clever way, but it also shows that making images and telling stories go hand in hand in the movies.

The movie, which was written by Miller and Augusta Gore, may not reach the emotional depth it aims for, but its bursts of visual splendor are spectacularly bright, sometimes lurid, and full of a vitality that’s increasingly missing from big-budget Hollywood spectacles, which are often led by boring plots and let down by boring visuals.

Does Three Thousand Years of Longing have post credit scene?

You know the rules: every Fantasy movie has to have at least one extra scene for people who stay until the end of the credits. But when it comes to Three Thousand Years of Longing movie there is chances of having post credit scene because of super fantastic scenes so yes, there is chances of having post credit scene.

If Three Thousand Years of Longing’s sudden shift into a full-on romance in the last act feels rushed or even a little sappy, it’s mostly made up for by Swinton and Elba’s unsurprising great performances.

They easily capture the shy longing and growing feelings of two beings who’ve been alone for a long time. Through their connection, the filmmakers show that they believe stories can be not only beautiful and amazing, but also a way for people who would otherwise be strangers to get to know each other.

Directed by George Miller.

Starring Tilda Swinton, Idris Elba, Ece Yüksel, Zerrin Tekindor, Erdil Yaşaroğlu, Kaan Guldur, David Collins, Alyla Browne, Nicola Mouawad, Burcu Gölgedar, Berk Ozturk, Ogulcan Arman Uslu, Pia Thunderbolt, Matteo Bocelli, Lachy Hulme, Megan Gale, Jack Braddy, and Aamito Lagum.