Do Electric Vehicles Lose Battery Life If They Are Not Used Regularly?

by Kirti Rajput

Electric vehicles (EVs) do lose battery capacity over time, regardless of how often they are used. This is known as “battery degradation.” The rate of battery degradation can vary depending on factors such as the type of battery, the climate, and the usage patterns of the vehicle.

If an EV is not used regularly, it can lead to a phenomenon called “self-discharge,” in which the battery loses a small amount of charge over time. This can be accelerated in high-temperature environments. However, self-discharge is not a significant factor in battery degradation.

What is the cause of battery degradation?

The primary cause of battery degradation is the number of charge and discharge cycles that the battery goes through. The more cycles a battery goes through, the more capacity it loses. This is why, generally speaking, the less an EV is driven, the less battery capacity it will lose over time.

However, it’s important to note that extreme temperatures, both hot and cold, can accelerate battery degradation, so it’s best to store the EV in a moderate temperature environment, if possible.

Additionally, most manufacturers have a battery warranty that covers a certain percentage of capacity loss over a certain period of time. Some EV batteries can lose as much as 20-30% of their capacity over 8-10 years, but it can vary depending on the model and usage pattern.

In summary, electric vehicles lose battery capacity over time, whether they are used regularly or not. However, the rate of battery degradation can be slower if the vehicle is not used as often, and extreme temperatures, both hot and cold, can accelerate battery degradation.